Ancient Egypt

In Ancient Egypt, approximately 6000-5000 BC, mental and physical illness were seen as the same thing. In this time period the heart and mind were translated as one, showing why there was no difference between mental and physical illnesses. The cause of illness, whether physical or mental, was seen as originating from evil spirits/demons or as the wrath of the gods (Keonig, 2000; Mohit, 2001). The Ancient Egyptians also viewed life as a continuous cycle, therefore they focused a lot of their beliefs on life after death. Healing, for these illnesses, was seen as a religious practice and the majority of therapy involved the use of temples and advice from religious deities (Mohit, 2001). Physicans, magicians, and priests all had the same role therefore the treatment of the mentally ill was no different from other illness treatment (Okasha, 2005). Ancient Egyptians had a very Monistic view of medicine, attributing little to the mind and all to the body. The majority of illnesses began with a bodily etiology and were treated physically or with psychotherapy (Okasha, 1999).

Medical knowledge from the Ancient Egyptian time period is drawn from  multiple sources:

  • Kahun Papyrus (1900 BC): addresses morbid states attributed to the displacement of the uterus.
  • Ebers’ Papyrus(1600 BC): the world’s oldest medical document.
  • Edwin Smith Papyrus(1600 BC): mainly about surgeries.
  • Hearst Papyrus: similar to Ebers’ Papyrus.
  • Berlin Medical Papyrus (1250 BC): prescriptions in an unsystematic arrangement.
  • London Medical Papyrus(1350 BC): contains enchantments or incantations for diseases (Okasha, 2005).

___________________________________________________________

Keonig, H. G. (2000) Religion and medicine I: Historical background and reasons for separation. International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine, 30, 385-398.

Mohit, A. (2001) Mental health and psychiatry in the middle east: Historical development. Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal, 7, 336-347.

.Okasha, A. (1999). Mental health in the Middle East: An Egyptian perspective. Pergamon, 19, 917-933.

.Okasha, A. (2005). Mental health in Egypt. Isr J. Psychiatry Related Science, 42, 116-125.

Page created by: Taylor Warner

12 Responses to Ancient Egypt

  1. michellea says:

    TO MCKAYLA: THANK YOU BOO! LOLOLOL

  2. mckayla says:

    yo butt makes me so HORNY

  3. michellea says:

    I LIKE BIG BUTTS AND I CANNOT LIE, YOU OTHER BROTHERS CANT DENY WHEN A GIRL WALKS IN WITH AN ITTY BITTY WAIST AND COMES AROUND YOUR WAY, YOU SPRUNG. OH BABY I WANNA GET WITH YA AND TAKE YO PICTURE.

  4. mckayla says:

    SUCK MY 12 INCH DICK NIGGA

  5. lindsey says:

    mckayla is a stupid hoe

  6. mckayla says:

    WHO DA FUCK IS LINDSEY! BITCH

  7. lindsey says:

    lindsey you stupid

  8. mckayla says:

    HEYYYYY I SEE YOU READING THIS

  9. mckayla says:

    BUBBLE BUTT BUBBLE BUTT BUBBLE BUTT SHANNON ATE ME LOLOLOLOLOLOL

  10. joey says:

    hi, what up yeah i know wait am i on something different this is not sent to you

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>